Hapax legomena and the productivity of the Old English weak verb suffixes

  1. Alonso, R.T. 1
  2. Villalta, G.M. 2
  1. 1 Universidad de La Rioja
    info

    Universidad de La Rioja

    Logroño, España

    GRID grid.119021.a

  2. 2 Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia
    info

    Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia

    Madrid, España

    GRID grid.10702.34

Journal:
Nordic Journal of English Studies

ISSN: 1502-7694

Year of publication: 2014

Volume: 13

Issue: 3

Pages: 188-211

Type: Article

Export: RIS
Institutional repository: lock_openOpen access editor

Metrics

Cited by

  • Scopus Cited by: 0 (30-11-2021)

SCImago Journal Rank

  • Year 2014
  • SJR Journal Impact: 0.267
  • Best Quartile: Q1
  • Area: Literature and Literary Theory Quartile: Q1 Rank in area: 41/744
  • Area: Language and Linguistics Quartile: Q2 Rank in area: 207/737
  • Area: Linguistics and Language Quartile: Q2 Rank in area: 224/756

CIRC

  • Social Sciences: A
  • Human Sciences: A

CiteScore

  • Year 2014
  • CiteScore of the Journal : 0.3
  • Area: Literature and Literary Theory Percentile: 78
  • Area: Language and Linguistics Percentile: 47
  • Area: Linguistics and Language Percentile: 46

Abstract

The aim of this article is to measure the productivity of the Old English weak verb suffixes-ettan, -læcan, -sian, -nian, -lian, -erian and -cian from a synchronic point of view by taking into account the role played by hapax legomena. Productivity in the narrow sense P and global productivity P∗ are measured and frequency is calculated in terms of type and token. Three types of hapax legomena are distinguished, namely absolute hapaxes (unique formations that appear in one text), relative hapaxes (formations that appear in different texts, but only once in each text) and mixed hapaxes (a subsumption of both types). This typology of hapaxes puts the focus on -sian, -erian, -lian and -cian, which range between very low and zero productivity.